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   Table of Contents - Current issue
Coverpage
September-October 2020
Volume 86 | Issue 5
Page Nos. 471-609

Online since Thursday, August 20, 2020

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EDITORIAL  

Article processing speed in the Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology p. 471
Saumya Panda
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_1080_20  PMID:32820737
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REVIEW ARTICLE Top

Malignant melanoma: Underlying epigenetic mechanisms p. 475
Hussein Sabit, Feroze Kaliyadan, Ritesh G Menezes
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_791_19  PMID:32769310
Although malignant melanoma is not the most common type of skin cancer, it is the most aggressive and fatal type as it can spread out and metastasize progressively. Early diagnosis and interventions lead to improved patient survival. The incidence rate of melanoma is dramatically increasing, with a few newer therapeutic options available. Therefore, establishing a reliable genetic or epigenetic-based diagnostic and prognostic tool is really important. In this review, we highlight the underlying epigenetic mechanisms involved in melanoma. Furthermore, the epigenetic-based therapeutic options will be also discussed. One of the key areas of discussion will be microRNA which is a small, single-stranded RNA molecule that serves as a regulatory element and found to regulate nearly a third of human genes. MicroRNAs play a role in a wide range of diseases including cancer. In malignant cells, it regulates cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis.
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ORIGINAL ARTICLES Top

Cytokine gene polymorphisms in type I and type II reactions in Hansen's disease p. 482
Vijendran Pragasam, Biju Vasudevan, Nikhil Moorchung
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_619_18  PMID:32372760
Introduction: Leprosy or Hansen's disease is a chronic debilitating disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Host genetics are believed to strongly influence the course of the disease. It is known that cytokines play an important role in leprosy and cytokine gene polymorphisms probably influence the course of the disease. Methods: In the present study, we evaluated 70 patients with leprosy and 243 controls. DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood and genotyping was done for the following polymorphisms: IL-1 RA intron 2, IL-1β-511 C/T and TNF-α A/G. Results: A strong association of TNF-α-308 G/A polymorphism with Hansen's disease with both genotypes and alleles was found. However, no correlation was identified between the other two polymorphisms and Hansen's disease. A strong association between the IL-1β gene polymorphisms and the type of reactions seen in leprosy was found. In contrast, the other two polymorphisms did not show any such association. Limitations: Genetic polymorphisms are association studies. They are not a direct reflection of the transcriptome or proteome and this is a major limitation of this study. Conclusion: In conclusion, cytokine gene polymorphisms appear to influence the susceptibility and course of Hansen's disease. An evaluation of the cytokine levels in the skin during lepra reactions would confirm this observation. Possibly, in future, this would be a guide to therapeutic decisions in cases of lepra reactions.
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Lack of association of IL-10 (rs1800896) and IL-13 (rs1800925) with non-segmental vitiligo susceptibility in South Indian population p. 489
Kalai Selvi Rajendiran, Medha Rajappa, Laxmisha Chandrashekar, DM Thappa, Panneer Devaraju
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_124_19  PMID:32295963
Background: Vitiligo is an autoimmune depigmentation disorder caused by multiple etiologies. Genetic polymorphisms in cytokine genes influence their expression and augment disease development. Analyzing the influence of genetic polymorphisms will help in better understanding of the complex etiopathogenesis of vitiligo. Aim: To study the influence of interleukin IL-10 (rs1800896) and IL-13 (rs1800925) polymorphisms on vitiligo risk in South Indian population. Methods: Two hundred and sixty-four vitiligo patients and 264 controls were recruited in this study. Genotyping was done by quantitative PCR and plasma cytokine levels were measured by ELISA. Results: Allele frequencies of IL-10 (rs1800896) and IL-13 (rs1800925) SNPs were observed to be equal in the groups. Mutant allele G of IL-10 (rs1800896) enhanced the familial inheritance of vitiligo (P < 0.0001, OR-25.1, 95% CI-7.64–82.7) and influenced the development of vulgaris type of vitiligo (P = 0.034, OR-1.83, 95% CI-1.07–3.13). Ancestral allele A of IL-10 (rs1800896) conferred protection against development of acrofacial vitiligo (P = 0.04, OR-0.56, 95% CI-0.33–0.95). Circulatory IL-10 levels in vitiligo patients were higher than controls (P < 0.0001). Individuals with genotype GG of IL-10 (rs1800896) had the highest circulatory levels of IL-10 (P < 0.0001). Among the genotypes of IL-13 (rs1800925) variant, none influenced the phenotype of nonsegmental vitiligo such as gender, family history, age of onset and types of vitiligo (P > 0.05). In addition, no difference was noted in the circulatory levels of IL-13 between patients and controls (P = 0.48). Within patients, CC genotype of IL-13 (rs1800925) was observed to enhance the circulatory IL-13 levels (P < 0.0001). Limitation: Replication group analysis in a larger multicentric cohort in future would validate further understanding of vitiligo susceptibility in South Indian ethnics. Conclusion: IL-10 (rs1800896) and IL-13 (rs1800925) polymorphisms did not confer risk to develop vitiligo in South Indian population.
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Assessment of liver and renal functions in human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons on highly active antiretroviral therapy: A mixed cohort study Highly accessed article p. 499
Vikram K Mahajan, Dhaarna Wadhwa, Aditi Sharma, Shailja Chauhan, Sanket Vashist, Prabal Kumar, Bhumika Chowdhry
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_169_18  PMID:31975695
Background: Indian data on potential hepatorenal toxic effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV/AIDS-affected persons is lacking. Objectives: To assess hepatorenal abnormalities in HIV-infected persons on HAART in a hospital-based mixed cohort study using concurrent and nonconcurrent data analysis. Methods: Hepatorenal function tests, urinalysis and ultrasonogaphy for liver/kidneys (when applicable) were assessed in 400 (men 185; women 215) persons aged 2–84 (mean 47.8) years on HAART. Acute liver toxicity, acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease were defined depending upon abnormal serum alanine aminotransferase, urea and creatinine levels/clearance as per standard guidelines. Results: The duration of HAART was 1 month to 9 years (mean 3.7 years) with 284 (71%) individuals being on treatment for ≤5years. The major HAART regimens included zidovudine + lamivudine + nevirapine in 175 (43.8%), tenofovir + lamivudine + efavirenz in 174 (43.5%) and zidovudine + lamivudine + efavirenz in 20 (5%) individuals and were associated with grade-1 hepatic dysfunction in 57 (14.3%) individuals, with men aged between 31 and 45 years on antiretroviral therapy for >5 years being mainly affected. Forty two (17.1%) of 246 individuals with anemia and 15 (9.7%) of 154 individuals without anemia showed hepatic dysfunction. None had acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease or abnormal urinalysis or ultrasonography. In contrast, the pretreatment elevated serum alanine amiotranerase in 99 (22.3%) and blood urea and/or creatinine levels in 16 (4%) individuals decreased significantly post highly active antiretroviral therapy. Conclusions: The study reflects the low frequency of regimen based highly active antiretroviral therapy-associated hepatic or nephrotoxicity despite prolonged use, especially in the absence of other risk factors. Preexisting anemia appears an important risk factor for highly active antiretroviral therapy-induced hepatotoxicity (OR 1.90, Cl 95% CI 1.02–3.57, P = 0.04). Highly active antiretroviral therapy-associated nephrotoxicity was not a significant problem. Study of viral load or other risk factors and potential of each drug for hepatorenal toxicity/dysfunction in HIV affected were not part of the study. A small number of subjects and retrospective analysis of biochemical parameters were other important limitations.
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Ultrasound liver elastography for the detection of liver fibrosis in patients with psoriasis and reactive arthritis on long-term methotrexate therapy: A cross-sectional study p. 508
Sujay Khandpur, Deepika Yadav, Banwari Jangid, Alok Kumar, Shalimar , K Devasenathipathy, Raju Sharma, Siddharth Datta Gupta, Ranjit Kumar, M Kalaivani
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_425_19  PMID:32525101
Background: Long-term low-dose methotrexate therapy is associated with liver fibrosis. Although liver biopsy is the gold standard for detecting fibrosis, it is an invasive procedure associated with morbidity and mortality risks. Hence noninvasive imaging techniques such as transient elastography (TE) and shear wave elastography (SWE) have been studied to measure liver stiffness. Aims: To assess the utility of TE and SWE in detecting fibrosis in patients with psoriasis and reactive arthritis on long-term methotrexate therapy. Methods: A cross-sectional prospective study was undertaken on 54 patients with psoriasis and reactive arthritis who had received ≥1.5 g of methotrexate. Various clinical and biochemical [fibrosis 4 index (FIB4), aspartate-transaminase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI)] parameters were calculated and liver stiffness measurement (LSM) was done with TE and SWE. The degree of steatosis was measured using controlled attenuation parameter (CAP). Liver biopsy was done when indicated and was interpreted by a pathologist blinded to clinical and imaging results. Results: Fifty four patients with a mean age of 40.3 years and a male-to-female ratio of 5:1 were included. The mean cumulative methotrexate dose was 3.04 g. The median FIB4, APRI, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase-to-platelet ratio values were 0.75, 0.23, and 0.15, respectively. The median LSM for TE and SWE was 5.3 and 7.32 kPa, respectively. SWE and TE showed a weak positive correlation (r = 0.26, P = 0.053). The mean CAP was 217 dB/m (area under the receiver operating characteristic = 0.70). In the 19 of 26 cases whose liver biopsies could be assessed, only 4 (21%) showed F1 fibrosis (Ishak staging). The median LSM on SWE was significantly higher in patients with a cumulative methotrexate dose ≥ 4 g when compared with those with a dose <4 g (9.85 vs 7.1, P = 0.02). Other parameters did not correlate with TE and SWE. Limitations: The small sample size and the low number of cases with significant fibrosis on histopathology were the major limitations of this study. Conclusion: Histologically detectable LF is uncommon in patients with psoriasis and reactive arthritis on long-term methotrexate therapy. Both TE and SWE are good at detecting the absence of fibrosis in these patients. In our study, SWE and TE values did not correlate with clinical, biochemical, or histopathological parameters.
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CASE REPORT Top

Oseltamivir-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis in a patient with Cushing's disease Highly accessed article p. 515
Jéssica González-Ramos, Cristina Lamas, Teresa Bellón, Elena Ruiz-Bravo, Elena Ramírez, Victoria Lerma, Beatriz Lecumberri
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_53_18  PMID:30688217
We report a case of a patient with Cushing's disease with oseltamivir-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis, who was treated with cyclosporine with favorable evolution. There is only one case reported of Cushing's disease and toxic epidermal necrolysis and very few oseltamivir-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis cases in literature. This report also discusses the role that the preexisting hypercortisolism condition may have played in the development and favorable resolution of the toxic epidermal necrolysis.
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BRIEF REPORTS Top

Analysis of submissions, editorial and peer-review process, and outcome of manuscripts submitted to the Indian Journal of Dermatology Venereology and Leprology over a 6-month period Highly accessed article p. 519
Vishal Gupta, Riti Bhatia, Mona Pathak, M Ramam
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_119_19  PMID:32167071
Background: Despite an interest in the editorial process at biomedical journals, not much information is available on this topic. Aims: To study the characteristics of the submissions to the Indian Journal of Dermatology Venereology and Leprology (IJDVL) and analyze the editorial and peer-review process and factors influencing the final outcome. Methods: Retrospective review of the manuscripts submitted to the IJDVL from January 1, 2016, to June 30, 2016. Results: The IJDVL received 639 manuscripts during the study period, most being Case reports (35%), Research articles (30%), and Letters to editor (20%). The proportion of submissions from Indian (53%) and foreign (47%) authors was comparable. About 55% (n = 353/639) of the submissions were editorially rejected. Some of the common reasons for editorial rejection included “sub-optimal images,” “no novelty,” “incomplete information or results,” and “incorrect diagnosis or interpretation of results.” The acceptance rate during this period was 19%. The median number of days to reach the final decision was 14 days for editorial rejection, 146 days for acceptance, and 85 days for rejection after external peer-review. The acceptance rates were higher for submissions from Indian authors [odds ratio (OR) 1.96], those submitted as Letters (OR 2.06), or in the area of tropical infections (OR 2.17). Submissions as research articles (expB = 1.23), those from Indian authors (expB = 1.15), final decision being acceptance (expB = 1.56), and those requiring preliminary author revisions (expB = 3.34), external re-reviews (expB = 2.22), and repeated author re-revisions (expB = 2.34) were associated with longer times to reach final decision. Limitations: A relatively short study period of 6 months. Conclusion: The IJDVL attracts submissions both from India and abroad. Articles submitted in the Letters category or related to tropical infections were most likely to be accepted. There is scope for improving the time taken for editorial processing of manuscripts.
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A comparative study on the turnaround time of article processing in dermatology journals: A need for improvement of this aspect in Indian journals p. 526
Seema Manjunath, Rajsmita Bhattacharjee, T Muhammed Razmi, Tarun Narang, Keshavamurthy Vinay
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_1043_18  PMID:32372759
Introduction: Submission and publishing of research articles in scientific journals is a multistep process that should be efficient and swift. Objective: To compare the editorial, peer review and publication time between Indian dermatology journals and international dermatology journals. Methods: Three Indian (Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology; Indian Journal of Dermatology and Indian Dermatology Online Journal) and three international (International Journal of Dermatology; the Australasian Journal of Dermatology and Dermatology [Karger]) dermatology journals were identified for this study. Information pertaining to time to acceptance, time to publication and the total time to publication were extracted for original articles, case reports and letters to the editor published in issues from January 2017 to December 2017. Results: The mean total time to publication in the order for Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, Indian Dermatology Online Journal, Indian Journal of Dermatology, International Journal of Dermatology, Dermatology and Australasian Journal of Dermatology were 12.61, 12.50, 9.14, 7.92, 7.13 and 6.52 months respectively. While time to acceptance and time to publication were the longest in Indian Journal of Dermatology (7.01 months) and Indian Dermatology Online Journal (8.99 months), respectively, Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology was found to have the maximum overall total time for publication i.e. 12.61 months. The differences among the journals were found to be significant for all three time measures (P < 0.0001, ANOVA). On comparison of Indian and international journals, all three time measures were found to be higher in Indian journals (5.81 vs 4.96 months, 6.75 vs 3.59 months and 11.53 vs 7.51 months, respectively) with the differences being significant (P < 0.0001, independent samples t-test). Limitation: This data does not represent the performance status of rejected manuscripts, the information of which was not available in the public domain. Conclusion: An effective editorial screening, fast-tracked editorial and peer review process and regulation on turnover time of submissions by Indian dermatology journals are imperative in improving the impact of research publication.
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IMAGES IN CLINICAL PRACTICE Top

Keratoacanthoma arising within a linear epidermal nevus Highly accessed article p. 531
Noureddine Litaiem, Asma Toumi, Faten Zeglaoui
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_842_18  PMID:31347516
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR - CASE LETTERS Top

Generalized hyperpigmentation of skin: A case of Carpenter syndrome p. 533
R Sivayogana, D Suresh
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_648_19  PMID:32769309
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A case of mutilating localized cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania donovani from Bhutan p. 536
Anjali Pal, Amitabha Saha, Sanhita Chatterjee, Soumen Saha
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_801_19  PMID:32769303
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Periungual deep-seated granulomatous pyoderma gangrenosum p. 540
Yosra Soua, Kamar Belhareth, Maha Lahouel, Rim Hadhri, Hayet Akkari, Hichem Belhadjali, Monia Youssef, Jameleddine Zili
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_840_19  PMID:32769316
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Pheohyphomycosis: A curious case of cyst p. 542
Vineet Relhan, Jaspriya Sandhu, Nita Khurana, Anuradha Chowdhary
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_141_18  PMID:32719195
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A rare case of phakomatosis pigmentokeratotica associated with unilateral renal hypoplasia p. 545
Asmita Sinha, Vivek Kumar, Rajesh Verma, Biju Vasudevan
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_1023_19  PMID:32769312
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Periungual tumor on the finger p. 549
Xiang-Xi Wang, Jin Yu
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_807_19  PMID:32719199
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR - OBSERVATION LETTERS Top

Skin biopsy–induced blistering in urticarial bullous pemphigoid Highly accessed article p. 552
Arshdeep , Meenakshi Batrani, Asha Kubba, Raj Kubba
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_453_18  PMID:31389377
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A novel mutation in LAMA3A gene in a child with laryngo-onycho-cutaneous syndrome from the Indian subcontinent p. 555
PSS Ranugha, Veeranna Shastry
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_947_19  PMID:32719197
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Neonatal herpes simplex infection acquired from herpes mastitis: An unusual mode of transmission p. 559
Simin Muhammed Kutty, Minu Nagesh, Pardeep Mann
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_921_19  PMID:32769305
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Three cases of IL36RN-associated pustulosis: An evolution of acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau to generalized pustular psoriasis p. 562
Yun-Liu Chen, Zhao-Yang Wang, Lin Ma, Zi-Gang Xu
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_581_19  PMID:32769301
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Videodermoscopy: A useful diagnostic tool for cutaneous metastases of prostate cancer p. 565
Joanna Monika Golinska, Marta Sar-Pomian, Lidia Rudnicka
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_972_19  PMID:32719196
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The grid pattern of white superficial onychomycosis p. 568
Chander Grover, Deepak Jakhar, Sonal Sharma
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_699_19  PMID:32769307
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Curcumin-induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis p. 571
Ming-Ying Wu, Hsi Yen, Chuang-Wei Wang, Wen-Hung Chung
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_9_19  PMID:32769304
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An atypical presentation of lupus vulgaris p. 573
Rima Gammoudi, Maha Lahouel, Wafa Saidi, Mohamed Denguezli
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_707_18  PMID:32769315
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Erythema multiforme-like linear immunoglobulin A bullous dermatosis p. 577
Rui Han, Siyuan Sun, Jun Ye, Hao Cheng
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_180_19  PMID:32769314
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Rupioid psoriasis induced by pembrolizumab p. 580
Ignasi Marti-Marti, Sara Gómez, Josep Riera-Monroig, Cristina Carrera, José M Mascaró
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_1067_19  PMID:32719194
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR - STUDY LETTERS Top

Genital discharge, human papillomavirus screening and contraceptive use in a tertiary care hospital in Mumbai, India p. 583
Priyanka Wagh, Nikhil S Bardeskar, Shilpa C Kerkar, Himangi Warke, Hemangi Chaudhari, Jayanti Mania-Pramanik
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_631_18  PMID:32769318
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Relationship between disease severity and fetuin-A levels in patients with psoriasis p. 586
Wafaa Ahmed Shehata, Mohamed Ahmed Basha, Iman Masoud Gayed, Shaimaa Basyouny Elhagary
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_355_19  PMID:32769317
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Lack of an etiologic role of human papillomavirus in the development of skin tags in the Korean population: A cross-sectional comparative study p. 588
Yu Ri Woo, Yujin Jung, Hyun Jeong Park
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_1063_19  PMID:32769308
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LETTER TO THE EDITOR - THERAPY LETTER Top

Giant condyloma acuminatum of Buschke and Löwenstein of the vulva: Successful treatment with diphenylcyclopropenone contact sensitization p. 592
Chi-Feng Yen, Chih-Hsun Yang, Jennifer Wu
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_107_19  PMID:32769313
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IMAGES IN CLINICAL PRACTICE Top

Microcystic adnexal carcinoma Highly accessed article p. 595
Mahendra M Kura, Veeral Manoj Aliporewala, Saroj Bolde, Sanjay Bijwe
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_677_18  PMID:31347515
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QUIZ Top

Asymptomatic swelling on the great toe in a 13-year-old boy Highly accessed article p. 597
Yasmeen Jabeen Bhat, Asif Nazir Baba, Faizan Younis Shah, Rohi Wani, Muzafar Ahmad Mir
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_334_18  PMID:31303638
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RESIDENTS’ PAGE Top

Gentian violet: Revisited p. 600
Neel Prabha, Ripu Daman Arora, Satyaki Ganguly, Namrata Chhabra
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_579_19  PMID:32769306
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PEARLS Top

Intratherapeutic dermoscopy assists nevus removal by laser therapy p. 604
Chun-Yu Cheng
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_569_19  PMID:32242869
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NET STUDY Top

Simple moulage for improving simulation for objective structured clinical examinations in undergraduate dermatology courses p. 606
Feroze Kaliyadan, Chander Grover, Joel Kuruvilla, Abdul Aziz Alkhateeb, Kaberi Feroze
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_596_19  PMID:32769302
Background: Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) is being increasingly used as an assessment tool for undergraduate dermatology courses. One of the practical difficulties in conducting OSCEs in dermatology is getting patients with typical skin lesions which can be used for the whole group to ensure uniformity of assessment. We present a study on the use of simple moulage techniques to create uniform and standardized skin lesions for OSCEs in dermatology. Methods: As a first step, the dermatology faculty in our department chose the clinical conditions which could be covered by using moulages. The main criteria considered were the importance of the condition to the exam blueprint, ease of making and resistance to handling (should not require frequent retouching). Moulages were created on volunteers after taking consent and the same were used in OSCEs s for a group of 5th-year students (N = 102). Difficulty and discrimination indices were compared between the stations using the moulage and the other stations. Qualitative feedback was obtained regarding the same from both the faculty and the students. Results: There was consensus among the faculty and the majority of the students that the lesions were clearly recognizable. As far as other psychometrics were concerned, average difficulty and discrimination of the stations using the moulage were good (average difficulty index—0.78 and average discrimination index—0.68) and compared favorably with the other stations (average difficulty index—0.77 and average discrimination index—0.57). Limitations: Limited number of stations included, lack of detailed item analysis and lack of feedback from the simulated patients were the main limitations in this study. Conclusion: For most common skin conditions creating moulages to simulate the corresponding lesions is an easy procedure and can be an effective tool to standardize dermatology OSCEs for undergraduates, especially in resource-poor settings.
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Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma Highly accessed article p. 606
Kalgi D Baxi, Santoshdev P Rathod, Raju G Chaudhary, Ashish Jagati
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_635_18  PMID:31975700
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Polarized and ultraviolet dermoscopy for the diagnosis of dermatophytosis of vellus hair Highly accessed article p. 607
Jiaoqing Tang, Yuping Ran
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_65_19  PMID:31898639
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A mycological study of tinea corporis: A changing epidemiological trend from Trichophyton rubrum to Trichophyton mentagrophytes in India Highly accessed article p. 607
Varsha Saxena, Manjunath Mala Shenoy, Jitendra Chandra Devrari, Vidya Pai, Vishal Agrawal
DOI:10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_766_17  PMID:32068195
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Erratum: Future therapies in melasma: What lies ahead? p. 608

DOI:10.4103/0378-6323.292501  PMID:32820738
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Editorial: Publishing in the Time of Pandemic: Editorial Policy of a Dermatology Journal During COVID-19 p. 609

DOI:10.4103/0378-6323.287444  PMID:32820739
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