Brand-Ad-30-6
 IADVL
Indexed with PubMed and Science Citation Index (E) 
 
Users online: 4215 
     Home | Feedback | Login 
About Current Issue Archive Ahead of print Search Instructions Online Submission Subscribe What's New Contact  
  NAVIGATE Here 
    Next article
    Previous article
    Table of Contents

 RESOURCE Links
    Similar in PUBMED
    Search Pubmed for
    Search in Google Scholar for
  Related articles
    Citation Manager
    Access Statistics
    Reader Comments
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed7016    
    Printed112    
    Emailed6    
    PDF Downloaded565    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 5    

Recommend this journal

 

 BRIEF REPORT
Year : 2008  |  Volume : 74  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 352--356

Fine needle aspiration cytology in leprosy


1 Department of Dermatology Venereology and Leprosy, Rajah Muthiah Medical College and Hospital, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar-608 002, India
2 Department of Pathology, Rajah Muthiah Medical College and Hospital, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar-608 002, India
3 Department of Microbiology, Rajah Muthiah Medical College and Hospital, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar-608 002, India

Correspondence Address:
PVS Prasad
88 AUTA Nagar, Sivapuri Post, Annamalai Nagar-608 002, Tamil Nadu
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0378-6323.42902

Rights and Permissions

Background: Laboratory diagnosis of leprosy by slit skin smear and skin biopsy is simple but both techniques have their own limitations. Slit skin smear is negative in paucibacillary cases whereas skin biopsy is an invasive technique. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) from skin lesions in leprosy with subsequent staining with May-Grunwald-Giemsa (MGG) stain has been found useful. Aim: To evaluate the possible role of cytology in classifying leprosy patients. Methods: Seventy-five untreated cases of leprosy attending the outpatient department were evaluated. Smears were taken from their skin lesions and stained using the MGG technique. Skin biopsy was also done from the lesions, which was compared with cytology smears. Results: A correlation of clinical features with FNAC was noticed in 87.5% of TT, 92.1% of BT, 81% of BL, and 66% of LL cases. Correlation of clinical with histopathological diagnoses revealed 12.5% specificity in TT leprosy, 55.3% in BT, 52.4% in BL and 50% in LL, and 100% in neuritic and histoid leprosy cases. Both correlations were found to be statistically significant by paired t test analysis. Thus, it was possible to distinguish the tuberculoid types by the presence of epithelioid cells and the lepromatous types by the presence of lymphocytes and foamy macrophages. Conclusion: FNAC may be used to categorize the patients into paucibacillary and multibacillary types, but is not a very sensitive tool to classify the patients across the Ridley-Jopling spectrum.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article

Online since 15th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow