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  Access statistics : Table of Contents
   1985| January-February  | Volume 51 | Issue 1  
 
 
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ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION
Grading the Response in Dermographic Urticaria
JS Pasricha, Preet Inder Dhillon
January-February 1985, 51(1):31-34
PMID:28164872
An instrument named Dermographism-Testing-and-Grading device was used for grading the response of patients having demographic urticaria, in comparison with controls. This device is capable of stroking the skin with, four different grades of pressure. The pressures used were such that none of the 250 controls (including.50 normal suliects, 100 patients having non-allergic skin diseases, 50 patients having non-urticarial allergic diseases and 50 patients having non-demographic urticaria), showed demographist with even the maximum pressure employed, while all the 25 patient, having demographic urticaria developed dermographism. Depending upon the minimum pressure re4uired, to elicit dermographism in these patients the severity of dermoloaphism could be graded as grade I in 8 patients, grade.11 in 6 and grade IV in 11 patients. None of the patients in " group showed grade III dermograph.ism. The dermographic grade varied at different body sites and local applications of oil, talcum powder and even tap water lowered the dermographic grade.
[ABSTRACT]   Full text not available  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub] [CITATIONS]  [PubMed]
  2,196 8 1
Prevalence of Scabies Among School Children in a Rural Block of Coastal Karnataka
SB Rotti, GD Prabhu, G Venkateswara Rao
January-February 1985, 51(1):35-37
PMID:28164873
A survey for scabies was conducted in 14 primary-and 2 high schools of one rural block of Dakshina Kannada district on the west coast of Karnatak from November 1982 to March 1983. A total of 5,128 (84.9%) out of the 6,041 registered children were examined. Prevalence of scabies among children aged 6 to 15 years was 8.2%, prevalence was higher among boys than girls; higher among children of backward communities than those of other communities- and higher among Muslims than among Hindus. History of another case of scabies at home was found in 37.37o of the cases.Secondary pyoderma was observed in 16.59'o of the, cases. Distribution of Lesions conformed to the pattern described in other studies. Results of follow-up after 3-5 weeks of treatment with 25% benzyl benzoate are also reported.
[ABSTRACT]   Full text not available  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [PubMed]
  2,122 4 -
CASE REPORTS
Coexistance of Subcorneal Pustular Dermatosis and Lepromatous Leprosy
RA Bumb, R Khullar, NK Mathur
January-February 1985, 51(1):48-49
PMID:28164879
A case of lepromatous leprosy having lesions of subcorneal pustular dermatosis is reported. This association supports the gypothesis that immunological factors are involved in the pathogenesis of SCPD.
[ABSTRACT]   Full text not available  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [PubMed]
  1,800 2 -
ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION
Occupational Dermatoses in Some Selected Industries in India
R Vijay Battu, JS Pasricha
January-February 1985, 51(1):26-30
PMID:28164871
Twenty five thousand and fifty employees working in 10 industrial units around Delhi were surveyed between July, 1982 and September, 1983. The industrial units included factories manufacturing tractors, rotating machines, gaskets, leaf spring, footwear, antibiotics and dashboard instruments; units printing cotton and synthetic cloth and books and periodicals; and a copper mine. The chief industrial dermatoses encountered were callositis 108 cases, contact dermatitis 36 cases, traumatic nail dystrophy 14 cases, frictional dermatitis of finger,7tips 10 cases, oil acne 10 cases, stasis dermatitis 3 cases, traumatic leucoderma 2 cases and keloid 2 cases. A total of 146 cases had industrial dermatoses, while 1085 had non- occupational skin disorders. The over-all incidence of occupational dermatoses in these industries was considerably low.
[ABSTRACT]   Full text not available  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub] [CITATIONS]  [PubMed]
  1,618 10 1
CASE REPORTS
Creeping Eruption on Glans Penis
K Pavithran, P Ramachandran Nair
January-February 1985, 51(1):44-45
PMID:28164877
A young male having a creeping eruption on the glans penis is reported.
[ABSTRACT]   Full text not available  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [PubMed]
  1,540 5 -
Osteoma Cutis
MB Gharpuray, VV Kulkarni, Raju Shah
January-February 1985, 51(1):42-43
PMID:28164876
A case of primary osteoma cutis seen in a 15-month-old female child is reported.
[ABSTRACT]   Full text not available  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [PubMed]
  1,416 4 -
ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION
Penicillin Resistant Gonococci
Meera Sharma, KC Agarwal, B Kumar, SK Sharma
January-February 1985, 51(1):22-25
PMID:28164870
Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of penicillin was estimated for 25 strains of N. gonorrhoeae, isolated over a period of 10 months (September 1983 June 1984). In 16 d be strains, the MIC of penicillin ranged between 0.01ug/ml and 0.63 ug/ml and all were negative for penicillinase production. In 9 strains, the MIC was 1.25 ug/ml, and 5 of these strains produced penicillinase. Of these 5 penicillinase producing strains, 4 had MIC10 ug/ml and in one it was 2.5 ug/ml.
[ABSTRACT]   Full text not available  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [PubMed]
  1,388 1 -
A clinico-mycological study of tinea pedis in North-Eastern India
C Ramanan, Gurmoban Singh, Paramjit Kaur
January-February 1985, 51(1):40-41
PMID:28164875
A total of 2306 patients were examined for ' the clinical evidence of tinea pedis. Only 52 of these were found to suffer from this condition. Trichophyton rubrum was the commonest (47.6%) isolate and it produced predominantly non-inflammatory scaly lesions. T mentagrophytes was the next commonest (21.4%) agent: it was responsible for most of the macerated lesions.
[ABSTRACT]   Full text not available  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [PubMed]
  1,060 4 -
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Penicillamine Induced Cheilosis
N Rajendran, A Koteeswaran, M Kala
January-February 1985, 51(1):50-50
PMID:28164880
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  1,007 3 -
CASE REPORTS
Multiple Neurilemmomas with Muscular Atrophy
RS Misra, V Ramesh, A Mukherjee, AK Sharma
January-February 1985, 51(1):46-47
PMID:28164878
A case of multiple, painful neurilemomas located over the right forearm and hand with severe in I wasting is presented.
[ABSTRACT]   Full text not available  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [PubMed]
  1,005 2 -
CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION
Transmission of Leprosy- A Review
BK Girdhar
January-February 1985, 51(1):14-21
PMID:28164869
Full text not available  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [PubMed]
  994 3 -
ORATION
Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in dermatology
RK Dutta
January-February 1985, 51(1):6-13
PMID:28164868
Full text not available  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [PubMed]
  187 45 -
ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION
Oral Zinc in acne vulgaris (a double blind evaluation)
Pramod Agrawal, PK Singh, SS Pandey, Gurmohan Singh
January-February 1985, 51(1):38-39
PMID:28164874
Full text not available  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [PubMed]
  129 10 -
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Role of zinc in erythema multiforme
BB Lal
January-February 1985, 51(1):50-52
PMID:28164881
Full text not available  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [PubMed]
  83 3 -
PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS
Presidential Address
F Handa
January-February 1985, 51(1):1-5
PMID:28164867
Full text not available  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [PubMed]
  81 1 -
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Reply
NK Mathur
January-February 1985, 51(1):52-52
PMID:28164882
Full text not available  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [PubMed]
  76 1 -
ARTICLES
Book Reviews

January-February 1985, 51(1):55-56
Full text not available  [PDF]
  40 0 -
Abstracts From Current Literature

January-February 1985, 51(1):53-54
Full text not available  [PDF]
  31 0 -
Online since 15th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow