IJDVL Home  
 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
[View FULLTEXT] [Download PDF]  
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 80  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 229-234

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization and disease severity in atopic dermatitis: A cross-sectional study from South India

Soumya Jagadeesan1, George Kurien2, Manjula Velikkakathu Divakaran3, Sadeep Melethil Sadanandan2, K Sobhanakumari2, A Sarin2 
1 Department of Dermatology, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, Kochi, Kerala, India
2 Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Government Medical College, Kottayam, Kerala, India
3 Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College, Kottayam, Kerala, India

Correspondence Address:
George Kurien
Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Government Medical College, Kottayam, Kerala
India

Background: Colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in atopic dermatitis is little studied but has therapeutic implications. It may have a role in disease severity given the additional virulence factors associated. Aims: Our aims were to record the proportion of patients with MRSA colonization in atopic dermatitis and to ascertain if any association exists between MRSA colonization and disease severity. Methods: An observational cross-sectional study involving children aged≤12 years with atopic dermatitis attending the outpatient department of Government Medical College, Kottayam was conducted. Socio-demographic data, exacerbating factors and risk factors for hospital care-associated MRSA were documented. Extent of atopic dermatitis was recorded using a standardized scale (Eczema Area Severity Index, EASI). Skin swabs were taken from anterior nares and the worst affected atopic dermatitis sites for culture and sensitivity. Results: Of the 119 subjects recruited during the study period (November 2009-April 2011), Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from 110 (92.4%) patients and MRSA from 30 (25.21%) patients. A total of 18 patients with MRSA had risk factors for healthcare associated-MRSA. The patients whose cultures grew MRSA were found to have significantly higher EASI score when compared to those patients colonized with methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (P < 0.01). Presence of Staphylococcus aureus, early age of onset, presence of food allergies, seasonal exacerbation and inadequate breastfeeding did not seem to influence disease severity. Conclusions: There is a high degree of prevalence of MRSA (25.2%) in atopic dermatitis and presence of MRSA is associated with increased disease severity. Further studies are needed to validate these findings.


How to cite this article:
Jagadeesan S, Kurien G, Divakaran MV, Sadanandan SM, Sobhanakumari K, Sarin A. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization and disease severity in atopic dermatitis: A cross-sectional study from South India.Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2014;80:229-234


How to cite this URL:
Jagadeesan S, Kurien G, Divakaran MV, Sadanandan SM, Sobhanakumari K, Sarin A. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization and disease severity in atopic dermatitis: A cross-sectional study from South India. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol [serial online] 2014 [cited 2019 Jul 18 ];80:229-234
Available from: http://www.ijdvl.com/article.asp?issn=0378-6323;year=2014;volume=80;issue=3;spage=229;epage=234;aulast=Jagadeesan;type=0


 

Thursday, July 18, 2019
 Site Map | Home | Contact Us | Feedback | Copyright and disclaimer