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CASE REPORT
  
Year : 1995  |  Volume : 61  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 109-110

Basal cell carcinoma in a long standing case of lupus vulgaris

S Nitin Vora, N Jayendra Dave, Amiyak Mukhopadhyay 
 

Correspondence Address:
S Nitin Vora


Abstract

A case of a 67-year-old male patient with a longstanding lupus vulgaris developing basal cell carcinoma is reported.



How to cite this article:
Vora S N, Dave N J, Mukhopadhyay A. Basal cell carcinoma in a long standing case of lupus vulgaris.Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 1995;61:109-110


How to cite this URL:
Vora S N, Dave N J, Mukhopadhyay A. Basal cell carcinoma in a long standing case of lupus vulgaris. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol [serial online] 1995 [cited 2019 Aug 19 ];61:109-110
Available from: http://www.ijdvl.com/text.asp?1995/61/2/109/4160


Full Text

 Introduction



Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a malignant epithelial tumour of the skin that arises from basal cells of the epidermis and its appendages. Different types of malignant changes may occur as a complication in a longstanding case of lupus vulgaris (LV), of which squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is commoner[1] but BCC is rarely reported.

 Care Report



A 57-year-old male patient presented with a superficial spreading plaque with threadlike margins on the left malar region. Ulceration, crusting and scarring were seen at places. The lesion had been present for the past 8 to 10 years. The patient was an indoor worker with no history of exposure to occupational carcinogens, ionising radiation, burns, etc. A biopsy had been taken from the lesion 4 years back which showed features characteristic of LV. Routine haemogram and Mantoux test were also in favour of tubercular infection. The patient had been given antitubercular drugs (rifampicin, INH, ethambutol) but he had stopped treatment midway. Treatment had been started again 1 year back with the same drugs but no response was seen, instead the plaque was seen to increase in size. A repeat biopsy was done and this time histopathology examination revealed a thinned and ulcerated epidermis with nests of atypical cells arranged in a palisading fashion typical of BCC. The patient was then referred to the oncologist for further management.

 Discussion



Various factors like a fair complexion, prolonged exposure to sunlight, radiation and chemical carcinogens have been implicated in the aetiopathogenesis of BCC.[2] Although prolonged exposure to sunlight in white-shinned people is the commonest cause of BCC it is rarely seen in dark-skinned individuals.[3] BCC is less commonly seen in cases of longstanding LV.[4] In our case the patient developed BCC in a longstanding lesion of LV. Chronic non-healing ulceration may be the aetiological factor.

References

1Tappeiner G, Wolff K. Tuberculosis and other mycobacterial infections. In: Dermatology in General Medicine (Fitzpatrick TB, Eisen AZ, Wolff K, et al, eds). 4th edn. New York: Mc Graw Hill, 1993:2379.
2Arnold HL, Odom R B, James WD. Andrews' Diseases of the Skin. 8th edn. W B Saunders Company, 1990,770-1.
3Carter DM, Lin AN. Basal cell carcinoma. In: Dermatology in General medicine (Fitzpatrick TB, Eisen AZ, Wolff K, et al, eds). 4th edn. New York: Mc Graw Hill, 1993:840.
4Savin JA. Mycobacterial infections. In: Textbook of Dermatology (Champion RH, Burton JL, Ebling FLG, eds). Oxford: Blackwell Scientific publications, 1992:1048.

 

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