Brand-Ad-30-6
 IADVL
Indexed with PubMed and Science Citation Index (E) 
 
Users online: 5632 
     Home | Feedback | Login 
About Current Issue Archive Ahead of print Search Instructions Online Submission Subscribe What's New Contact  
  Navigate here 
  Search
 
  
 Resource links
   Similar in PUBMED
    Search Pubmed for
    Search in Google Scholar for
   Article in PDF (894 KB)
   Citation Manager
   Access Statistics
   Reader Comments
   Email Alert *
   Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
   Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1478    
    Printed694    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded748    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 


 
 Table of Contents    
IMAGES IN CLINICAL PRACTICE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 86  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 392-393

Insect tattoos


Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprosy, Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College and Hospital, Puducherry University, Puducherry, India

Date of Web Publication09-Jul-2019

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Hima Gopinath
Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprosy, Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College and Hospital, Puducherry University, Madagadipet - 605 107, Puducherry
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_226_18

Rights and Permissions



How to cite this article:
Meghana V, Gopinath H, Karthikeyan K. Insect tattoos. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2020;86:392-3

How to cite this URL:
Meghana V, Gopinath H, Karthikeyan K. Insect tattoos. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Jul 14];86:392-3. Available from: http://www.ijdvl.com/text.asp?2020/86/4/392/262485




A 62-year-old male patient presented with sudden-onset asymptomatic, multiple irregular light brown to blackish-brown macules of size varying from 0.1 to 0.7 mm on bilateral soles [Figure 1]. The insteps were spared. There was history of him walking barefoot in his grocery shop, where there were multiple insects crawling over the floor during the monsoon season. The macules could not be removed with soap and water, but faded partially on scrubbing with acetone. A diagnosis of burrowing bug (Chilocoris assmuthi)pigmentation was made. Insects such as Kermococcus vermilis (kermes dye), Kerria lacca (lac dye), and Cochineal species (scarlet, orange, red tints) have been used as sources of dyes since ancient times. Burrowing bug produces blackish brown pigmentation when crushed. This may be due to insect pigment, ingested pigments, or the colour may be produced on exposure of insect products to the environment or the skin. This pigmentation needs to be differentiated from lentigines, petechiae, tinea nigra, and dermatosis neglecta.
Figure 1: Multiple irregular light brown to blackish brown macules of varying sizes over bilateral soles

Click here to view


Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form, the patient has given his consent for his images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patient understands that name and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.




    Figures

  [Figure 1]



 

Top
Print this article  Email this article

    

Online since 15th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow