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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 84  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 678--684

A prospective study of the epidemiological and clinical patterns of recurrent dermatophytosis at a tertiary care hospital in India


1 Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
2 Department of Microbiology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
3 Department of Histopathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Correspondence Address:
Sunil Dogra
Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh - 160 014
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_645_17

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Background: Recurrent and clinically unresponsive dermatophytosis is being increasingly encountered in our country. It runs a protracted course with exacerbations and remissions. However, there is little information regarding the extent of the problem and the characteristics of recurrent dermatophytosis in published literature. Aims: We sought to determine the prevalence, risk factors and clinical patterns of recurrent dermatophytosis in our institution. We also investigated the causative dermatophyte species and antifungal susceptibility patterns in these species. Methods: One hundred and fifty patients with recurrent dermatophytosis attending the outpatient department of the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India were enrolled in the study conducted from January 2015 to December 2015. A detailed history was obtained in all patients, who were then subjected to a clinical examination and investigations including a wet preparation for direct microscopic examination, fungal culture and antifungal susceptibility tests. Results: Recurrent dermatophytosis was seen in 9.3% of all patients with dermatophytosis in our study. Trichophyton mentagrophytes was the most common species identified (36 patients, 40%) samples followed by T. rubrum (29 patients, 32.2%). In-vitro antifungal susceptibility testing showed that the range of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) on was lowest for itraconazole (0.015–1), followed by terbinafine (0.015–16), fluconazole (0.03–32) and griseofulvin (0.5–128) in increasing order. Limitation: A limitation of this study was the absence of a suitable control group (eg. patients with first episode of typical tinea). Conclusion: Recurrence of dermatophytosis was not explainable on the basis of a high (MIC) alone. Misuse of topical corticosteroids, a high number of familial contacts, poor compliance to treatment over periods of years, and various host factors, seem to have all contributed to this outbreak of dermatophytosis in India.






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