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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 84  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 285--291

Association of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist intron 2 variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism with vitiligo susceptibility in Gujarat population


1 Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat, India
2 Department of Skin and VD, Sir Sayajiraogaikwad Medical College, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Rasheedunnisa Begum
Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat - 390 002
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_1_17

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Background: Vitiligo is a multifactorial, polygenic, autoimmune skin disorder caused by selective destruction of melanocytes. Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist intron 2 polymorphism was found to be associated with various autoimmune disorders. Aims: We aimed to investigate the association of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist intron 2 variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism (rs2234663) with vitiligo to assess interleukin 1 receptor antagonist transcript levels and to perform possible genotype–phenotype correlation. Methods: Three hundred and seven vitiligo patients and 316 controls were enrolled in the study, genotyping of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist rs2234663 was performed by polymerase chain reaction, and relative gene expression of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist was carried out in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients (n = 36) and controls (n = 36) by real-time-PCR. Results: A significant difference was observed in the frequency of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist *A (1/2) genotype among patients with active and stable vitiligo (P = 0.0172). Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist*A (2/2) genotype and allele frequencies were significantly different between SV patients and controls (P = 0.0246 and P = 0.0046, respectively). Significant difference was also observed for interleukin 1 receptor antagonist*A2 (allele) in active and stable vitiligo patients (P = 0.0060). However, other comparisons did not show any significant difference in genotype and allele frequencies. Moreover, interleukin 1 receptor antagonist*A (3/2) genotype was observed only in patients whereas interleukin 1 receptor antagonist*A (5/2) was observed only in controls. Gene expression analysis showed no significant difference in interleukin 1 receptor antagonist transcript levels in patients compared to controls (P = 0.5962). Interestingly, genotype–phenotype correlation analysis revealed that individuals with IL1RN*A (2/2) exhibited higher interleukin 1 receptor antagonist expression compared to other major genotypes interleukin 1 receptor antagonist*A (1/2) (P = 0.01) and interleukin 1 receptor antagonist*A (1/1) (P = 0.03). Limitations: More case-control studies on interleukin 1 receptor antagonist rs2234663 polymorphism and gene expression from different ethnic populations are required to explore the impact of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist in vitiligo susceptibility. Conclusion: Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist*A2 might be a risk factor for progressive vitiligo.






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