IADVL
Indexed with PubMed and Science Citation Index (E) 
 
Users online: 3050 
     Home | Feedback | Login 
About Current Issue Archive Ahead of print Search Instructions Online Submission Subscribe What's New Contact  
  Navigate here 
  Search
 
  
 Resource links
   Similar in PUBMED
    Search Pubmed for
    Search in Google Scholar for
   Article in PDF (1,451 KB)
   Citation Manager
   Access Statistics
   Reader Comments
   Email Alert *
   Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
   References
   Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1454    
    Printed1    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded34    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 


 
 Table of Contents    
PEARLS
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 83  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 268-269

Assembling a make-shift light source for a radio frequency device for skin ablation


1 Department of Dermatology, KIMS Al Shifa Super Speciality Hospital, Perinthalmanna, Kerala, India
2 Department of Respiratory Medicine, William Harvey Hospital, Ashford, United Kingdom
3 Faculty of Dermatology, College of Medicine, King Faisal University, Hofuf, Saudi Arabia

Date of Web Publication3-Feb-2017

Correspondence Address:
Karalikkattil T Ashique
Department of Dermatology, KIMS AL SHIFA Super Speciality Hospital, Perinthalmanna - 679 322, Kerala
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0378-6323.199427

Rights and Permissions



How to cite this article:
Ashique KT, Kolakkadan K, Kaliyadan F. Assembling a make-shift light source for a radio frequency device for skin ablation. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2017;83:268-9

How to cite this URL:
Ashique KT, Kolakkadan K, Kaliyadan F. Assembling a make-shift light source for a radio frequency device for skin ablation. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol [serial online] 2017 [cited 2017 Apr 26];83:268-9. Available from: http://www.ijdvl.com/text.asp?2017/83/2/268/199427


Radio frequency-based procedures are frequently performed in dermatology offices.[1],[2] The presence of brighter light in the operating field adds to the precision of the procedure and improves results. Lesions such as small skin tags or dermatosis papulosa nigra are better treated when there is optimal lighting. Adjusting light sources can be difficult in small-practice settings, where there is a single dermatologist. We have devised a “piggy back apparatus” with a light-emitting diode light source for making radio frequency machines (for skin ablation) useable even in a very dark room. A commercially available Chinese light-emitting diode light with a goose neck to make it flexible (predominantly marketed for lighting laptop keyboard with USB power), is used for this purpose. The apparatus basically works on 5 volts, deriving electricity from a USB source. The light-emitting end where the light-emitting diode is located is fixed with a tape as piggy back, which adds only 20 g to the weight of the hand piece [Figure 1]. The USB end of the goose neck is extended by cutting the USB male jack which adds 1.25 m of wire in between. This makes the distance to the power source more versatile. The USB end is connected to any mobile phone charger or a portable energy bank (which works in the 5 Volt range) [Figure 2a] and [Figure 2b]. The advantage of the devise over commercially available light-emitting diode headgear is that in situ ations when the opposite side of the neck, axilla, abdomen of the patient is to be illuminated for procedure, the latter may not be able to throw adequate light as much as the illumination directly on the hand piece. The limitation of the modification is that the life of the light-emitting diode source is unpredictable which may warrant frequent replacement.
Figure 1: The mechanism at work with ample light thrown at the operating field

Click here to view
Figure 2a: The light source with a mobile phone charger as the power source

Click here to view
Figure 2b: The energy bank used as a portable alternative to power the device

Click here to view


Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
  References Top

1.
Taheri A, Mansoori P, Sandoval LF, Feldman SR, Pearce D, Williford PM. Electrosurgery: Part I. Basics and principles. J Am Acad Dermatol 2014;70:591.e1-14.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Taheri A, Mansoori P, Sandoval LF, Feldman SR, Pearce D, Williford PM. Electrosurgery: Part II. Technology, applications, and safety of electrosurgical devices. J Am Acad Dermatol 2014;70:607.e1-12.  Back to cited text no. 2
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2a], [Figure 2b]



 

Top
Print this article  Email this article

    

Online since 15th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow