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 REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 80  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 204--213

Severe combined immunodeficiency mouse-psoriatic human skin xenograft model: A modern tool connecting bench to bedside


1 Research, VA Medical Centre Sacramento; Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Davis, CA 95616, USA
2 Research, VA Medical Centre Sacramento, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Davis, CA 95616, USA

Correspondence Address:
Smriti Kundu-Raychaudhuri
VA Medical Center Sacramento, Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine,10535 Hospital Way, Bldg#807, Mather, CA, 95655
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0378-6323.132247

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Psoriasis is a multifactorial chronic inflammatory disease. Research into the pathogenesis of this disease is hindered by the lack of a proper animal model. Over the past two decades, many scientists were involved in the development of animal models that nearly mirror the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis. One such model, which has opened doors to the study of molecular complexities of psoriasis as well as its treatment, is the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse-human skin chimera model. This model not only mirrors the clinical and histopathological features of psoriasis but also help in the study of cell proliferation, angiogenesis, function of T cells, neurogenic inflammation and cytokines involved in inflammatory reactions. In this article, we have reviewed the prospects and the limitations of the SCID mouse model of psoriasis.






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Online since 15th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow