IADVL
Indexed with PubMed and Science Citation Index (E) 
 
Users online: 4186 
     Home | Feedback | Login 
About Current Issue Archive Ahead of print Search Instructions Online Submission Subscribe What's New Contact  
  NAVIGATE Here 
    Next article
    Previous article
    Table of Contents

 RESOURCE Links
    Similar in PUBMED
    Search Pubmed for
    Search in Google Scholar for
  Related articles
    Citation Manager
    Access Statistics
    Reader Comments
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed9149    
    Printed179    
    Emailed12    
    PDF Downloaded485    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 4    

Recommend this journal

 

 REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 78  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 692--697

Immunofluorescence antigen mapping for hereditary epidermolysis bullosa


1 Department of Dermatology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka, India and Commonwealth fellow at St. John's Institute of Dermatology, St. Thomas' Hospital, London, SE1 7EH, United Kingdom
2 Department of Dermatology, St. John's Institute of Dermatology, St. Thomas' Hospital, London, SE1 7EH, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Raghavendra Rao
Department of Dermatology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka, India

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0378-6323.102358

Rights and Permissions

Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of inherited, mechanobullous disorders that are caused by mutations in the structural proteins in the epidermis or dermoepidermal junction. Characteristic clinical picture is the presence of blisters at trauma prone areas of the body, which develops at or soon after birth. Availability of specific monoclonal antibodies against the target proteins together with advances in the molecular genetics have led to the revision in the classification of EB. Now four major types of EB are recognized depending upon the level of blister and the location of target protein: EB simplex (epidermolytic), junctional EB (lucidolytic), dystrophic EB (dermolytic) and Kindler's syndrome (mixed cleavage plane). The laboratory tests not only help to confirm the diagnosis of EB but are also an important tool to classify (and subtype) EB. These include immunofluorescence antigen mapping (IFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and mutation analysis. IFM is the most preferred method for final diagnosis of EB worldwide. It is relatively easy to perform and results can be obtained rapidly. This article describes the technicalities and significance of IFM in various types of EB.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article

Online since 15th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow