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 SYMPOSIUM - CONTACT DERMATITIS
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 78  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 552--559

Contact allergy to topical corticosteroids and sunscreens


Indushree Skin Clinic, Lucknow, India

Correspondence Address:
Abir Saraswat
Indushree Skin Clinic, B-7, Indira Nagar, Lucknow 226016
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0378-6323.100520

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Topical corticosteroids and sunscreens are extensively used formulations, both as over-the-counter products and as prescription medicines. Topical corticosteroids are increasingly being recognized as causes of allergic contact dermatitis. Because of their anti-inflammatory property, contact allergy to these agents may be difficult to suspect and prove. With corticosteroid allergy, there are special issues in patch testing that need to be considered: Screening tests need to be done with budesonide and tixocortol pivalate, and delayed readings are essential to pick up all positive cases. Preventive advice needs to be tailored according to the structural and chemical peculiarities of a particular molecule. Sunscreen allergy is a significant part of cosmetic allergy; especially in cases of photoallergic reactions. Each passing decade is bringing forth new allergens in this class. In many countries, benzophenones have recently been replaced by octocrylene as the leading causes of contact dermatitis to sunscreens. This article provides a broad overview of corticosteroid and sunscreen allergy so that the readers are aware of these important emerging classes of allergens.






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Online since 15th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow