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Year : 2012  |  Volume : 78  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 225-227

Lobulated mass on the back of the scalp


1 Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Leprosy, R. G. Kar Medical College, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
2 Department of Psychiatry, Calcutta National Medical College, Kolkata, West Bengal, India

Date of Web Publication9-Mar-2012

Correspondence Address:
Sudip Kumar Ghosh
Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Leprosy, R. G. Kar Medical College, 1 Khudiram Bose Sarani, Kolkata - 700 004, West Bengal
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0378-6323.93653

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How to cite this article:
Ghosh SK, Bandyopadhyay D, Ghoshal L, Sarkar S. Lobulated mass on the back of the scalp. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2012;78:225-7

How to cite this URL:
Ghosh SK, Bandyopadhyay D, Ghoshal L, Sarkar S. Lobulated mass on the back of the scalp. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol [serial online] 2012 [cited 2019 Jun 20];78:225-7. Available from: http://www.ijdvl.com/text.asp?2012/78/2/225/93653


A 22-year-old man presented with a large swelling on the back of his scalp. The lesion was present since his birth and had progressed in size gradually. It was not associated with any local or systemic symptom. His medical history and family history was unremarkable.

Examination revealed a well-demarcated, firm, protuberant mass measuring about 20 cm × 12 cm in size and was studded with multiple, coalescing, skin-colored nodules. There were parallel folds and furrows giving rise to a cerebriform appearance of the occipital area of the scalp. Hairs were sparse on the lesion and multiple broken stumps of hairs were also seen [Figure 1]. There was no skin erosion, dermatitis, infection, odor or tenderness. There was no other mucocutaneous lesion. He had normal intelligence (the full-scale intelligent quotient was 98) and he had no psychiatric problem. Examination of the neurological, ophthalmological and other systems was normal.
Figure 1: A well-delineated protuberant mass, studded with multiple, coalescing, skin-colored nodules, interspersed with parallel folds, giving rise to a cerebriform appearance. Hairs are sparse on the lesion

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Routine laboratory test results, chest X-ray, and ultrasonography of the abdomen were within normal limits. Computed tomographic (CT) scan of the head showed no bony or intracranial abnormalities. Histopathological examination of multiple lesional punch biopsy specimens was carried out [Figure 2] and [Figure 3].
Figure 2: Nests of nevus cells in the papillary and deep reticular dermis without any junctional component and cellular atypia. Sparse hair follicles in the dermis (H and E, ×100)

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Figure 3: Nests of nevus cells containing varying amounts of melanin in the dermis (H and E, ×400)

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  What is the Diagnosis? Top




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  References Top

1.Yazici AC, Ikizoglu G, Baz K, Polat A, Ustunsoy D. Cerebriform intradermal nevus. Pediatr Dermatol 2007;24:141-3.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.Larsen F, Birchall N. Cutis verticis gyrata: Three cases with different aetiologies that demonstrate the classification system. Australas J Dermatol 2007;48:91-4.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.Van Geest AJ, Berretty PJ, Klinkhamer PJ, Neumann HA. Cerebriform intradermal naevus (a rare form of secondary cutis verticis gyrata). J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol 2002;16:529-31.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.Hayashi Y, Tanioka M, Taki R, Sawabe K, Kore-Eda S, Utani A, et al. Malignant melanoma derived from cerebriform intradermal naevus. Clin Exp Dermatol 2009;34: e840-2.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.Quaedvlieg PJ, Frank J, Vermeulen AH, Toonstra J, van Neer FJ. Giant ceribriform intradermal nevus on the back of a newborn. Pediatr Dermatol 2008;25:43-6.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.Alcántara González J, Truchuelo Díez MT, Carrillo Gijón R, Martín Diaz RM, Jaén Olasolo P. Cerebriform intradermal nevus presenting as secondary cutis verticis gyrata. Dermatol Online J 2010;16:14.  Back to cited text no. 6
    


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