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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 77  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 489--493

Clinical profile and impact on quality of life: Seven years experience with patients of alopecia areata


1 Department of Medicine, Kuwait University, Kuwait
2 Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Farwaniya Hospital, Farwaniya, Kuwait

Correspondence Address:
Nawaf Al-Mutairi
Post Box No. 280, Farwaniya 80000
Kuwait
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0378-6323.82411

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Background: Alopecia areata (AA) is the most common cause of localized, non-scarring alopecia. Stress and other psychological factors have been implicated in the causation of the disease, and it is also found to alter the course of the disease process. Unfortunately no one has studied the impact of AA on the quality of life, which includes the social life of the patients. Aim: To study the clinical profile and impact of alopecia areata on the quality of life, including the social life of adult patients with severe forms of the disease. Methods: The present study determined the clinical pattern of AA and its impact on the quality of life (QOL) in all the patients with severe forms of alopecia areata attending the Dermatology Outpatient Department. Results: The male : female ratio was 1.86 : 1. Most (58.03%) of the patients were between 21 and 40 years of age. Almost 40% of the patients had associated systemic disease or other dermatological disorders. A family history of AA was found in 593 (20.02%) of the patients. Nail changes were observed in 297 (10%) of the patients. There were significant differences between the mean Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) score in cases with severe forms of AA and controls ( p0 < 0.001). Conclusions: Severe forms of alopecia areata had a major impact on the psychosocial well-being of the patients. These individuals had to be treated early, and they required more than just prescription drugs. Educational and psychological support in addition to medical therapy for AA could improve their long-term physical outcomes.






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