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Year : 2011  |  Volume : 77  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 251-

Unresponsive cutaneous leishmaniasis and HIV co-infection: Report of three cases


1 Department of Dermatology, SP Medical College and PBM Group of Hospitals, Bikaner, Rajasthan, India
2 Department of Dermatology, Institute of Pathology (ICMR), Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Ram A Bumb
H-3, PBM Hospital Campus, Bikaner, Rajasthan
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0378-6323.77484

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Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a vector borne disease caused by various species of Leishmania parasite. CL is endemic in the Thar desert of Rajasthan state and Himachal Pradesh in India. Immune suppression caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with atypical clinical presentation of CL which responds poorly to the standard treatment and causes frequent relapses. We are reporting three cases of localized and disseminated CL due to Leishmania tropica which failed to respond to conventional intralesional/intramuscular sodium stibogluconate (SSG) injections. Initially, we did not think of HIV infection because CL is endemic in this region. When patients did not respond to SSG injections, we performed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests for HIV and they turned out to be HIV positive. Our report showed that CL is emerging as an opportunistic infection associated with HIV/AIDS and may be the first manifestation in HIV positive patients in an endemic area.






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Online since 15th March '04
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