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   Primary Prevention
   Secondary Prevention
   References

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ACNE IN INDIA: GUIDELINES FOR MANAGEMENT - IAA CONSENSUS DOCUMENT
Year : 2009  |  Volume : 75  |  Issue : 7  |  Page : 61

Acne prevention


members Indian Acne Alliance, India

Correspondence Address:
Raj Kubba
Consultant Dermatologist, Kubba Clinic,10, Aradhana Enclave, Ring Road, New Delhi - 110066
India
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Source of Support: Production and publication of this supplement is made possible by an educational grant from Galderma India Pvt. Ltd., Conflict of Interest: Indian Acne Alliance (IAA) meetings logistics to formulate IAA consensus document DQAcne in India: Guidelines for managementDQ were supported by Galderma India Pvt. Ltd.


PMID: 19282602

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How to cite this article:
Kubba R, Bajaj A K, Thappa D M, Sharma R, Vedamurthy M, Dhar S, Criton S, Fernandez R, Kanwar A J, Khopkar U, Kohli M, Kuriyipe V P, Lahiri K, Madnani N, Parikh D, Pujara S, Rajababu K K, Sacchidanand S, Sharma V K, Thomas J. Acne prevention. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2009;75, Suppl S1:61

How to cite this URL:
Kubba R, Bajaj A K, Thappa D M, Sharma R, Vedamurthy M, Dhar S, Criton S, Fernandez R, Kanwar A J, Khopkar U, Kohli M, Kuriyipe V P, Lahiri K, Madnani N, Parikh D, Pujara S, Rajababu K K, Sacchidanand S, Sharma V K, Thomas J. Acne prevention. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol [serial online] 2009 [cited 2019 Oct 22];75, Suppl S1:61. Available from: http://www.ijdvl.com/text.asp?2009/75/7/61/45493


Presently, little is known about preventing the onset of acne. Lifestyle and wellness modifications could conceivably help, but are generally ignored.


  Primary Prevention Top


Diet: Role of diet in acne causation and prevention is complex and controversial. On the one hand, there is no evidence that acne is exacerbated by chocolate, nuts, candy, soft drinks, etc, [1],[2],[3] and on the other hand, there is compelling epidemiologic data that implicates glycemic diet, [4] and excess consumption of dairy products in acne. [5] In India, the popular notion is that acne is aggravated by eating mangoes, sweets, fatty/fried foods, and some seafoods.

Physical activity: Acne is rarely triggered or aggravated by sports, or certain physical activities. Whenever evident, it is rewarding to make appropriate adjustments. More commonly, physical activity and sports are beneficial as they promote health and help overweight individuals with hormonal conditions, such as polycystic ovarian disease and insulin resistance, lose weight, which in turn aids in acne treatment.

Medications: Care should be taken to avoid medications known to be acnegenic. Some important examples are steroids, lithium, antiepileptics, and antituberculous drugs. However, when such drugs are prescribed for serious diseases, their acnegenic effect may be brought to the attention of the treating physician.

Family history: In individuals with strong family history of acne, especially if on both sides of the family, antiacne treatment should begin early to prevent morbidity and scarring.


  Secondary Prevention Top


Long-term therapy is required, often several months beyond clinical remission, to prevent relapse. Maintenance treatment such as topical retinoids should be continued throughout the susceptible age, that is, till age 30 years.

 
  References Top

1.Fulton JE, Plewig G, Kligman AM. Effect of chocolate on acne. JAMA 1069;210:2071-4.  Back to cited text no. 1    
2.Tan JK, Vasey K, Fung KY. Beliefs and perceptions of patients with acne. J Am Acad Dermatol 2001;44:439-45.  Back to cited text no. 2  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]
3.Green J, Sinclair RD. Perceptions of acne vulgaris in final year medical student written examination answers. Australas J Dermatol 2001;42:98-101.  Back to cited text no. 3  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]
4.Cordain L, Lindeberg S, Hurtado M, Hill K, Eaton SB, Brand-Miller J. Acne vulgaris: A disease of western civilization. Arch Dermatol 2002;138:1584-90.  Back to cited text no. 4  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]
5.Adebamowo CA, Spiegelman D, Danby FW, Frazier AL, Willett WC, Holmes MD. High school dietary dairy intake and teenage acne. J Am Acad Dermatol 2005;52:207-14.  Back to cited text no. 5  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]




 

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