IADVL
Indexed with PubMed and Science Citation Index (E) 
 
Users online: 6170 
     Home | Feedback | Login 
About Current Issue Archive Ahead of print Search Instructions Online Submission Subscribe What's New Contact  
  NAVIGATE Here 
    Next article
    Previous article
    Table of Contents

 RESOURCE Links
    Similar in PUBMED
    Search Pubmed for
    Search in Google Scholar for
  Related articles
    Citation Manager
    Access Statistics
    Reader Comments
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed6603    
    Printed87    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded8    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 

 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2002  |  Volume : 68  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 131--132

High altitude and nail growth


Department of Dermatology and STD, Command Hospital (SC), Pune-411 040, India

Correspondence Address:
M PS Sawhney
Department of Dermatology and STD, Command Hospital (SC), Pune-411 040
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 17656907

Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

Linear nail growth studies were carried out in 22 highlanders Ladakhi (3445m) and 6 lowlander male troops, in 4 during their fresh induction into high altitude (3445m) and in 2 during their stay in plains while on leave from high altitude. The average age of highlander Ladakhis was 21.82 years (range 16-36 years) and lowlanders was 34 years (range 29 - 40 years). There was significant decrease in nail growth in age matched (average age 34.25) highlander Ladakhis (93.11 /day, SD 7.24, P< 0.05) and in freshly inducted lowlanders (88.71/ day, SD 10.7, P<0.05) in contrast to average nail growth in plains (1191/day, SD 1.41) Although the average nail growth in highlander Ladakhis (99.34/day, SD 13.91) was more than the low landers inducted into high altitude (88.7s /day, SD 1 o.7) the difference was not found statistically significant (P> 0.05). However it does suggest some degree of acclimatization in highlanders. Hypoxic conditions and extreme cold conditions both appear to be factors responsible for decreased nail growth in high altitude areas.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF Not available]*


        
Print this article     Email this article

Online since 15th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow