IADVL
Indexed with PubMed and Science Citation Index (E) 
 
Users online: 297 
     Home | Feedback | Login 
About Current Issue Archive Ahead of print Search Instructions Online Submission Subscribe What's New Contact  
  Navigate here 
  Search
 
   Next article
   Previous article 
   Table of Contents
  
 Resource links
   Similar in PUBMED
    Search Pubmed for
    Search in Google Scholar for
   [PDF Not available] *
   Citation Manager
   Access Statistics
   Reader Comments
   Email Alert *
   Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed6272    
    Printed136    
    Emailed4    
    PDF Downloaded5    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 
HOW I MANAGE
Year : 2001  |  Volume : 67  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 328

Tinea versicolor


Department of Dermato-Venereology, A1alabar Institute of Medical Sciences, Calicut, India

Correspondence Address:
Department of Dermato-Venereology, A1alabar Institute of Medical Sciences, Calicut, India



How to cite this article:
Pavithran K. Tinea versicolor. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2001;67:328


How to cite this URL:
Pavithran K. Tinea versicolor. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol [serial online] 2001 [cited 2019 Dec 8];67:328. Available from: http://www.ijdvl.com/text.asp?2001/67/6/328/11247


Tinea versicolor caused by Malassezia furfur (Pityrosporum orbiculare) continues to be a therapeutic challenge. As its name suggests it is often hypopigmented or coloured brown, pink or black and the scales are fine and branny. Diagnosis depends on demonstration of clusters of spores and short hyphae in KOH mounts of skin scrapings.
Localised lesions respond to common topical antifungals such as whitfield's ointment, 1% miconazole or 1% clotrimazole. Extensive lesions may require shampoo containing 2.5% selenium sulphide. It is applied as follows:
Take 60ml of water in a plastic bucket and add 2-3 ml of shampoo in it and stir well. The lather that comes out is to be applied below neck all over the body and wash off after 30 minutes. At night he can apply topical 1% clotrimazole and then apply dusting powder containing clotrimazole or combination of acid salicylic 3% and acid benzoic 6%. The whole treatment is to be continued daily for 7 days, then alternate days for 2 weeks and then once in a week for 6 months to one year.
For florid lesions or those cases that do not respond to above described treatment may require systemic treatment. Fluconazole is commonly used. It is given 300 mg orally as single dose or 300 mg repeated in 3 weeks. Oral itraconazole 200 mg daily for 5 days or 100 mg daily for 10 days is another alternative. But it is more expensive than fluconazole.
Selenium sulfide shampoo is to applied on the scalp for those having associated seborrhoeic dermatitis. 

 

Top
Print this article  Email this article
Previous article Next article

    

Online since 15th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow