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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2000  |  Volume : 66  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 247-248

Pattern of skin diseases in Bantwal Taluq, Dakshina Kannada




Correspondence Address:
Maria Kuruvilla


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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 20877090

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  Abstract 

A survey was conducted to find out the pattern of skin diseases among patients who attended the fortnightly medical camp held in Bantwal Taluq, a rural area. Infective disorders were found in 42.68% and non infective in 41.58%. Among the infective disorders fungal infections were most common (24.08%). Among the non infective dermatoses eczemas were most common (33.93%). On comparing the proportional infectivity rate of infectious diseases among males and females it was found that in scabies males were more affected than females.


Keywords: Skin diseases pattern, Rural community


How to cite this article:
Kuruvilla M, Sridhar K S, Kumar P, Rao G. Pattern of skin diseases in Bantwal Taluq, Dakshina Kannada. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2000;66:247-8

How to cite this URL:
Kuruvilla M, Sridhar K S, Kumar P, Rao G. Pattern of skin diseases in Bantwal Taluq, Dakshina Kannada. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol [serial online] 2000 [cited 2019 Nov 14];66:247-8. Available from: http://www.ijdvl.com/text.asp?2000/66/5/247/4935



  Introduction Top


The pattern of skin disease in India is affected by various ecologic factors like economic background, environmental factors, literacy level, social, mental and racial factors. Our knowledge of the pattern of skin disease is based on observations made from hospitals from various parts of India. [1],[2],[3] Prevalence of dermatoses in tribal areas has been studied by Mahalingam. [4] There is a lack of information about pattern of skin diseases in rural areas from Karnataka. The present study is an attempt to fill this lacuna.

As part of the out reach programme of Kasturba Medical college, Mangalore, free medical camps are held fortnightly in Bantwal Taluq about twenty six kilometres away from Mangalore city. A study of all new cases attending the camp for dermatological problems was done.


  Materials and Methods Top


All new cases attending the fortnightly camp with dermatological complaints during the period January to December 1997 were examined in detail. Skin diseases were classified into two groups infective and non infective. Cases of sexually transmitted diseases were excluded from the study. All cases requiring special investigations like biopsy were referred to the Dermatology department of K.M.C Mangalore.


  Observations Top


Out of a total of 10,800 new cases attending the camp, 731 presented with skin complaints (6.77%). Among the 731 fresh cases examined 319 (43.64%) were males and 412 (56.36%) were females. Majority of patients (39.26%) were in the 10-29 year age group [Table - 1]

Infective dermatoses [Table - 2] were seen in 312 (42.68%) and non infective in 304 (41.58%).

Among the infective disorders fungal infection (24.08%) was most common followed by cabbies (9.44%) and pyoderma (7.25%) Among the non infective dermatoses eczemas (33.93%) constituted the maximum followed by pigmentary dermatoses (4.10%) and papulo squamous disorders (2.87%). Contact dermatitis (15.72%), lichen simplex chronicus (5.47%), fore-foot eczema (4.03%) and asteatotic eczema (1.2%) were some disorders noted under eczemas. One case each of squamous cell carcinoma of lip and malignant melanoma of sole were diagnosed.


  Discussion Top


The pattern of infectious and non infectious disorders noted in this study were similar to other studies. Fungal infections were the most common among infective disorders (24.08%). The incidence of fungal infections varied from 7% to 12.08% in other studies. [1],[2],[3] The proportional infectivity rate due to scabies in this study was only 9.44%. This may be due to regular school surveys which are conducted in the locality. On comparing the proportional infectivity rate of infectious diseases in males and females it was found that in scabies males were more affected than females (Z= 2.453). In a survey for scabies conducted in primary schools in the same district the prevalence of scabies among children was 8.2% and prevalence was higher among boys. [5]

Among the non infectious disorders eczemas constituted the maximum (33. 93%). Infectious diseases in the community can be reduced by regular school surveys and health educa­tion.



 
  References Top

1.Mehta TK. Pattern of skin diseases in India. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 1962;28:134-9.  Back to cited text no. 1    
2.Gangadharan C, Joseph A, Sarojini PA. Pattern of skin diseases in Kerala. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 1976;42:49-51.  Back to cited text no. 2    
3.Dayal SG, Gupta GD. A cross section of skin diseases in Bunelkhand region, UP. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 1977;43:258-61.  Back to cited text no. 3    
4.Mahalingam C. Prevalence of Dermatoses in Tribal population of Kalrayan Hill (South Arcot District). Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 1986;52:213-5.  Back to cited text no. 4    
5.Rotti SB, Prabhu GD, Venkateswara Rao. Prevalence of Scabies among school children in a rural block of coastal Karnataka. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 1985;51:33-7.  Back to cited text no. 5    


Tables

[Table - 1], [Table - 2]



 

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