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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 1997  |  Volume : 63  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 384-385

Diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis without systemic involvement : Response to topical augmented betamethasone dipropionate under plastic occlusion




Correspondence Address:
Sudha Sarraf


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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 20944388

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How to cite this article:
Sarraf S, Singh S, Kumar M, Pandey S S. Diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis without systemic involvement : Response to topical augmented betamethasone dipropionate under plastic occlusion. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 1997;63:384-5

How to cite this URL:
Sarraf S, Singh S, Kumar M, Pandey S S. Diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis without systemic involvement : Response to topical augmented betamethasone dipropionate under plastic occlusion. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol [serial online] 1997 [cited 2019 Aug 18];63:384-5. Available from: http://www.ijdvl.com/text.asp?1997/63/6/384/4626


To the Editor

A 11-month-old baby girl born to nonconsanguineous parents, with an uneventful normal vaginal delivery, was brought with the complaints of intermittent episodes of generalised itch all over body for past 3 months. She had bullous eruption appear­ing spontaneously or following trauma for 5 months. The lesions used to heal without scarring. Her milestones of development were normal. There was no history of dyspnoea, wheeze, diarrhea or syncope. On examination, generalised yellowish-white thickening of skin was found with edema and accentuated normal skin markings. A few lesions were present on scalp and face, palms and soles were spared. These changes were more marked in the axillae and groins. Skin had a soft doughy consistency. Mucous mem­branes, hair and nails were normal. Systemic examination was also normal. The follow­ing investigations were within normal lim­its : total and differential counts, haemoglobin, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, liver function tests, ultrasonogram of abdomen, and bone marrow aspiration and cytology.

Histopathological examination of the skin biopsy showed dense round cell infiltration in dermis with normal epidermis. Special stain with Giemsa confirmed these cells to be mast cells. A diagnosis of diffuse cutane­ous mastocytosis was made. The patient was treated with promethazine elixir (15mg) at bed time. Topical 0.50% betamethasone dipropionate cream in opti­mized vehicle was applied under plastic film occlusion for 4-6 hours per day. After 2 weeks, application was reduced gradually to alternate days and then twice weekly, which has been continued for the past one year. The patient became symptom-free within 2 weeks of the beginning of treatment. Diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis is a very rare variety of mast cell disorder and consists of a diffuse mast cell infiltration of the skin. The prognosis of diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis when associated with systemic mast cell infiltration is not good. However, systemic involvement does not always oc­cur [1] This case is reported because of its rar­ity and because the condition has not been reported from India.

 
  References Top

1.Haensch R, Ippen H, Zur klinik der Mastzell. Erythrodemie. Hautarzt 1968; 19: 403-407.  Back to cited text no. 1    




 

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