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   Abstract
   Introduction
   Case Report
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CASE REPORT
Year : 1995  |  Volume : 61  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 375

Congenital leopard vitiligo associated with multiple sclerosis




Correspondence Address:
Puneet Bhargava


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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 20953031

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  Abstract 

A 31-year old Muslim male presented with congenital leopard vitiligo associated with multiple sclerosis. Five other family members had similar cutaneous lesions since birth. The disease appeared to be transmitted by autosomal dominant pattern with variable penetrance.


Keywords: Vitiligo, Congenital, Multiple Sclerosis


How to cite this article:
Bhargava P, Mathur K D, Bhargava R. Congenital leopard vitiligo associated with multiple sclerosis. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 1995;61:375

How to cite this URL:
Bhargava P, Mathur K D, Bhargava R. Congenital leopard vitiligo associated with multiple sclerosis. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol [serial online] 1995 [cited 2019 Sep 15];61:375. Available from: http://www.ijdvl.com/text.asp?1995/61/6/375/4282



  Introduction Top


Vitiligo is an acquired disease of pigmentation characterised by depigmented macule/patches surrounded by normal or hyperpigmented border. Sometimes it may be present since birth. Leopard vitiligo[1] is a clinical condition characterised by generalised pathches of vitiligo intermingled with hyperpigmentation simulating leopard skin. Multiple sclerosis[2] is a demyelinating disease characterised by chronic inflammation, demyelination and gliosis of CNS probably autoimmune in origin, triggered by a viral infection in a genetically susceptible host.

Here we report a case of congenital leopard vitiligo associated with multiple sclerosis.


  Case Report Top


A-31-year-old Muslim male was admitted in neurology ward of SMS Medical College Hospital with complaint of blurring of vision, photophobia and pain in right eye. After thorough fundus examination, EEG, X-Ray skull, and CT Scan, the patient was diagnosed as a case of multiple sclerosis. The patient was referred to dermatology department for cutaneous lesions. On examination there were multiple depiqmented macular lesions intermingled with hyperpigmented patches all over the body simulating leopard skin since birth. Skin biopsy from depigmented lesions was consistent with vitiligo. Urinary porphyrins were absent. Blood sugar, thyroid profile and VDRL were normal. 5 other closely related family members had similar type of lesions since birth without any associated illness. The trait appeared to be transmitted by autosomal dominant pattern.


  Comments Top


Vitiligo and multiple sclerosis have autoimmune mechanism of genesis. In this case it seems that in genetically predisposed persons multiple clones of autoantibodies are found, some are directed against melanocytes and others against myelin basic protein leading to this association. Further, both appear to be transmitted by autosomal dominant pattern.

Vitiligo has been associated with multiple autoimmune conditions such as diabetes mellitus, pernicious anaemia, thyroiditis, Addison's disease, alopecia aerata and morphea.

 
  References Top

1.Bhargava R. K. Leopard vitiligo. Arch Dermatol 1986;122(1):378-9.  Back to cited text no. 1    
2.Stephen L Hauser. Multiple sclerosis. In: Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, (Kurt) Jsselbacker, Eugene Braunwald, Jean D Wilson, eds). 13th end. Vol.2,2287-94.  Back to cited text no. 2    




 

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Online since 15th March '04
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